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Old 03-30-2010, 12:32 PM
cassidy98 cassidy98 is offline
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Hi Guys my 11 year daughter was diagnosed with type 1 3 weeks ago. Our world has not been the same ever since. Everyone on here sounds so calm I cant wait to get that back at some stage even a glimps of it.
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Old 03-30-2010, 05:02 PM
dano dano is offline
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cassidy98;

I can relate to your terror! My son was diagnosed with T1, at the age of ten (10), nearly twenty-two (22) years ago. If it is any consolation to you, diabetes is much easier to manage in this day and time, plus with the advent of several sugar substitutes they can have some treats. I wish you both great success and wellness in dealing with this disease.
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Old 04-06-2010, 11:29 PM
cassidy98 cassidy98 is offline
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Thanks for your response. Feeling a little better since I posted last. Those first few weeks are just so scarey. I think what got to me the most was all I kept hearing is the "forever" and "no Cure" and needles for the rest of your childs life.
It pretty devastating. So we are just taking one day at a time. She seems to be handling better than me and Dad. Im now at the "it could have been worst" stage.
Cassidy seems to be having hypos everyday is that normal??
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Old 04-09-2010, 03:04 AM
mtendler mtendler is offline
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It's weird in the honeymoon stage, which is what your daughter is in now.
Sometimes the body works with you and sometimes it works against you during that stage.

Hypos could mean that her body is still working like "normal" and that her insulin injections are contributing to her lows.

Honestly, find REALLY GOOD DIABETES EDUCATORS/GO TO THE JOSLIN CLINIC FOR A WEEK. If you don't feel comfortable with your educators, then find new ones and get recommendations.

Where are you located?
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Old 04-17-2010, 12:48 PM
cassidy98 cassidy98 is offline
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We are in Rockhampton QLD. How do you know for sure when the honey moon period is over?
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Old 04-19-2010, 02:22 AM
dano dano is offline
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Basically, the honey moon period is over when the body completely stops producing insulin. At this point the body is solely dependant on the injected insulin and you should see lows subside.
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Last edited by dano; 04-19-2010 at 12:18 PM.
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Old 05-02-2010, 04:20 AM
kyramom kyramom is offline
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Hi Cassidy98. My daughter, who is 6 years old, was diagnosed last April 18. I'm in the same boat as you are. I am trying not to long for "life before diabetes"... as I know that will never come back. I am up now because she's running too high and I need to check her again after a few minutes. Well, between her and a newborn baby, sleep (or good sleep) is just not in my vocabulary at the moment.

Yes, we are fearful...so I'm just trying to be thankful -- that there is insulin, that this is manageable, that she can still do everything she likes to do albeit with more care. Whenever I try to think of one thing to be thankful for when I'm feeling too scared, then I regain some calmness and sense of peace.

We were at her cousin's school fair last night. It was breaking my heart to see her stare at a boy eating ice cream in front of her and to see the look of longing on her face. Then I thought all that sugar in the ice cream is not good for anybody, so she was much better off than the boy who was eating it!

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Old 05-04-2010, 01:33 PM
cassidy98 cassidy98 is offline
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Hi Kyramom,

I get teary just reading your post. You dont really know what you take for granted until it is taken from you. Just like start cooking tea when you feel like it...gone, it has to be around the same time everynight. Just little things are now big things. Do you know what I mean?

Cassidy had another hypo to day at school. When the school call me my heart stops - thinking whats happened and how bad is it.

Where are you from? Do you have much support where you are?
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Old 05-04-2010, 02:04 PM
dano dano is offline
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When my son was diagnosed with T1 Diabetes, many years ago, we chose to have him taken to Kosair Children’s Hospital in Louisville, KY, since it was the best hospital in the State for "Juvenile" Diabetes, at that time. On the trip there, following the ambulance, I could not get the thoughts of how bad this situation was out of my head. The Diabetes wing was on the fifth floor and each day we would pass the fourth floor numerous times. On many occasions we stopped at the fourth floor to be welcomed by a smiling child, with no hair, riding in a red wagon and saying good bye to parents, while they waved and smiled as they entered the elevator. These parents, trying to maintain their composure as the doors closed, would totally break down after the doors closed. This broke my heart. I decided then and there that I was very fortunate, my child was very fortunate and his situation could have been a lot worse. Since that time, I have looked at Diabetes as an inconvenience and I have been very thankful for what I have. Today he is doing well and leads a very productive life. I hope that my story helps you in some way.
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Last edited by dano; 05-04-2010 at 02:16 PM.
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Old 05-05-2010, 07:13 AM
robgolbeck robgolbeck is offline
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Dano, that is a great story. I've always viewed my diabetes the same way - as an inconvenience, not a death sentence. It takes discipline to manage, and certainly there are very serious risks if it's not managed properly, but like you said it could be A LOT worse.

But I do understand how it can be scary for a parent when their child is diagnosed with diabetes (or any disease for that matter). My diagnosis freaked my mom out more than it did me, and for the first few years she blamed herself for not "doing something" to prevent it. But over time she came to accept that she couldn't have done anything.

I believe that the best way to control your diabetes is through education and awareness - both on your own and with the help of a good team of diabetes professionals. A good "diabetes" lifestyle is really just a healthy lifestyle, and there's no reason diabetes should stop anyone from living an active, successful life.
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